George Weikert Barn & Farmhouse - U.S. Civil War - Gettysburg, PA
Posted by: Groundspeak Regular Member Math Teacher
N 39° 48.100 W 077° 14.127
18S E 308622 N 4408135
Quick Description: This 18th century barn and house both saw significant action during the Battle of Gettysburg, when they were used as a temporary field hospitals by Union troops on the July 2-3, 1863.
Location: Pennsylvania, United States
Date Posted: 6/11/2013 4:52:11 PM
Waymark Code: WMH9KX
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member Outspoken1
Views: 4

Long Description:

The barn one of three pre-Civil War buildings on the Weikert Farm. The barn was originally a double-bay log barn, but significant alterations have changed the appearance. One complete log bay has been removed, and a frame shell with forebay has been constructed over the remaining log section. During the battle of Gettysburg, the barn was used as a temporary field hospital by Union troops on the July 2-3, 1863. The barn may date from as far back as 1798, when the farm was owned by Peter Weikert. SOURCE

This Civil War house was sited between the 3rd and 5th Corps Army of the Potomac lines, and used as field hospital during the second day of fighting for Union casualties. The house was occupied by Union soldiers for all three days of the battle.

Besides being a field hospital and really old, the farm itself saw significant fighting, some of it in the Weikert's yard. The barn waas located just in front of the main Union battle line throughout most of the battle (July 2-5), which made its use for hospital purposes limited. It was most likely used for shelter and concealment by Union skirmishers engaged with Confederate skirmishers near the Trostle buildings and Plum Run on July 2-4. On July 2, Brigadier General John C. Caldwell's division of Major General Winfield Scott Hancock's Second Corps rushed past the Weikert House on its way to the Wheatfield. George and his family left the farm during the fighting. Afterwards they returned to scenes of desolation familiar to many Gettysburg residents. The house was a field hospital, with wounded filling the parlor and amputated arms and legs piled outside the windows. According to family history, six men died just in the parlor, and the yard was filled with graves. When the buried were exhumed to be placed in the National Cemetery, the missing parlor rug was found, cut into strips as the top and bottom layers of the burial trench. I tried to get close to see all there was to see but thought it was private property. Little did I know (until I returned home) te George Weikert Farm is now owned by the National Park Service. Before the park service acquired the land, the farm was purchased by survivors of the New Jersey Brigade to presrve the land that the brigade held during the battle.

The George Weikert farm is at the corner where United States Avenue, Sedgwick Avenue and Slocum Avenue all come together. It is one of several Weickert farms in the area at the time of the battle, with three belonging to George's sons and another to a distant cousin. The farmstead in on the left or south side of the Avenue if traveling east along United States Avenue. The barn is about 150 feet from the road. I visited the interpretive on Thursday, July 5, 2012 @ 5:25 PM, EDT & @ an altitude of 555 feet, ASL. I used a Canon PowerShot 14.1 Megapixel, SX210 IS digital camera for the photos.

The George Weikert Farm Barn is a contributing feature to the Gettysburg National Military Park Historic District which is nationally significant under NR Criteria A, B, C & D. Areas of Significance: Military, Politics/Government, Landscape Architecture, Conservation, Archeology-Historic. Period of Significance: 1863-1938. The original National Register Nomination was approved by the Keeper March 19, 1975. An update to this nomination was approved by the Keeper on January 23, 2004. The monument is identified as structure number 098.

From the Nomination Form:
The barn was located just in front of the main Union battle line throughout most of the battle (July 2-5), which made its use for hospital purposes limited. It was most likely used for shelter and concealment by Union skirmishers engaged with Confederate skirmishers near the Trostle buildings and Plum Run on July 2-4. Minor interior modification occurred to convert a portion of the barn to stable and office purposes in the 1960s

Log Barn existed prior to Civil War battle, it is 1 of 3 double log barns still extant in park. Probably used as field hospital during last 2 days of battle.

Short Physical Description:
1-story 31'6"'x50'6" dbl pen log plank barn encased in vertical board, believed constructed c. 1798, 10'5"x30'10" lean-to addition at W elev, 8'x 80' shed roof extension on S elev.

Long Physical Description:
Barn (1798) is a one-story double pen log barn encased in vertical boards on a stone foundation. The barn measures 31.5 x 50.5 feet. It has a 10.4 x 30.8 foot lean-to on the west side. The gable roof is covered with wood shingles.


My Sources
1. NRHP Nomination Form
2. Stone Sentinels
3. Draw the Sword
4. Civil War Wiki
5. Library of Congress

Address:
Gettysburg National Military Park Confluence of United States, Sedgwick & Slocum Avenues Gettysburg, PA 17325


Name of War: United States Civil War

Type of Documentation: Web Page/Historical Documentation

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