Harold Nicolson and Vita Sackville-West - Ebury Street, London, UK
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member Master Mariner
N 51° 29.479 W 000° 09.149
30U E 697673 N 5708308
Quick Description: This brown, English Heritage "blue" plaque, is attached to a building on the north west side of Ebury Street in London.
Location: London, United Kingdom
Date Posted: 5/17/2014 11:49:05 AM
Waymark Code: WMKQJ8
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member Norfolk12
Views: 0

Long Description:

The brown plaque tells us:

English Heritage

Harold
Nicolson
1886 - 1968
Vita
Sackville-West
1892 - 1962
Writers and Gardeners
lived here

The Encyclopaedia Britannica website tells us about Sir Harold:

Sir Harold Nicolson, in full Harold George Nicholson    (born Nov. 21, 1886, Tehran, Iran—died May 1, 1968, Sissinghurst Castle, Kent, Eng.), British diplomat and author of more than 125 books, including political essays, travel accounts, and mystery novels. His three-volume Diaries and Letters (1966–68) is a valuable document of British social and political life from 1930 to 1964.

Nicolson was born in Iran, where his father, Sir Arthur Nicolson (later 1st Baron Carnock of Carnock), was chargé d’affaires. Throughout his youth, his family moved about from diplomatic post to post, in central Europe, Turkey, Madrid, and Russia. He studied at Balliol College, Oxford (receiving a “pass degree” in 1907; he received a B.A. and M.A. in 1930). He entered the Foreign Office in 1909, with which he remained for 20 years, serving at such overseas posts as Madrid, Tehran, and Berlin.

In 1929 Nicolson decided to abandon his diplomatic career. He had already published several biographies: Paul Verlaine (1921), Tennyson (1923), Byron, the Last Journey (1924), Swinburne (1926), and Some People (1927), as well as a novel and other pieces. On Jan. 1, 1930, he became a columnist for Lord Beaverbrook’s London Evening Standard and also, on that day, began a diary, in which he made daily entries until Oct. 4, 1964. (Three volumes were edited and published by his son Nigel Nicolson in the late 1960s.)

Along with his newspaper work, Nicolson also wrote book reviews and gave radio talks. From 1935 to 1945 he was a member of Parliament. He was knighted in 1953. Some of his later books were Curzon, the Last Phase (1934), Politics in the Train (1936), Helen’s Tower (1938), Diplomacy (1939), The Congress of Vienna (1946), King George V (1952), and Journey to Java (1957).

In 1913 Nicolson married the poet and novelist Victoria Sackville-West. Although both proved to have homosexual proclivities, their marriage of deep friendship lasted until her death in 1962. The Nicolsons’ home, Long Barn, near Sevenoaks, Kent, became famous for its handsome gardens.

The Encyclopaedia Britannica website tells us about Vita:

V. Sackville-West,  (born March 9, 1892, Knole, Kent, Eng.—died June 2, 1962, Sissinghurst Castle, Kent), English novelist and poet who wrote chiefly about the Kentish countryside, where she spent most of her life.

She was the daughter of the 3rd Baron Sackville and a granddaughter of Pepita, a Spanish dancer, whose story she told in Pepita (1937). In 1913 she married Harold Nicolson, a diplomat and author. Her poetic gift for evoking the beauty of the English countryside was recognized in her long poem The Land (1926). Apart from her many novels, of which the best known are The Edwardians (1930) and All Passion Spent (1931), she also wrote biographies and several gardening books. She was the chief model for the character Orlando in the novel of that title written by Virginia Woolf. In 1948 she was made a Companion of Honour.

Portrait of a Marriage (1973) by her son Nigel Nicolson is based on his mother’s journal detailing her sexless friendship with her husband and her love affair with another woman. Dearest Andrew: Letters from V. Sackville-West to Andrew Reiber, 1959–1962 (1979) reveals her life to a gardening friend.

Blue Plaque managing agency: English Heritage

Individual Recognized: Harold Nicolson and Vita Sackville-West

Physical Address:
182 Ebury Street
London, United Kingdom


Web Address: [Web Link]

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