The North-South Central Axis of Beijing City - Beijing, China
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member tmob
N 39° 55.419 E 116° 23.430
50S E 447915 N 4419460
Quick Description: The emperors in ancient China believed that they were the center of the world, so all of their palaces should be built on the axis across “the center”from south to north of Beijing.
Location: China
Date Posted: 4/30/2013 6:28:03 AM
Waymark Code: WMH01E
Views: 14

Long Description:
«Beijing central “axis”, which is interpreted as a royal line. The emperors in ancient China believed that they were the center of the world, so all of their palaces should be built on the axis across “the center”from south to north of Beijing. The central axis is relatively intact.

So it is a good idea to visit the Beijing Attractions which are perched the royal axis: from south to north in Beijing , you will see Yongdingmen Tower, Temple of Heaven, Tiananmen Square, the Forbidden City, Bell and Drum Towers.

Traditional thinking concludes that the south-north axis, coincides with the Earth meridian, and the earth itself is the axis around the north-south rotation from west to east, Beijing axis represents the standard of the most primitive on earth. The central axis of Beijing has a history of 730 years starting to Yuan Dynasty to Qing Dynasty.

Beijing local government is working on the application for World Cultural Heritage for the central axis of Beijing extending 7.8km from Yongdingmen to the the Bell and Drum Towers.»

-- Source

Meridian Gate (Wumen)

«Wumen in Chinese, it is the southern gate and the only entrance now to the Forbidden City. After touring Tiananmen Square, tourists can walk through the Tianmenmen Tower (Gate of Heavenly Peace) to the Duanmen Gate, and then get through it and arrive at the square before it.

Chinese emperors believed that they were the Sons of Heaven and therefore should live at the center of the universe. They believed the Meridian went through the middle of the gate and built the entire Forbidden City symmetrically to this axis, and thus it was named accordingly.»

-- Source

This marker on the floor is located in Jingshan Park on the top of Jingshan Hill, facing north. This is the highest point in Beijing.

It is just a few meters, and alligned, with The Central Point of Beijing City marker.

Line type: Historical meridian

Tolerance: 0

If other type, please explain.: Not listed

Visit Instructions:
Post a picture of the object and tell something about your visit at site.
Search for...
Geocaching.com Google Map
Google Maps
MapQuest
Bing Maps
Nearest Waymarks
Nearest Great Lines of Earth
Nearest Geocaches
Nearest Benchmarks
Create a scavenger hunt using this waymark as the center point
Recent Visits/Logs:
There are no logs for this waymark yet.