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Robert Falcon Scott - Oakley Street, London, UK
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member Master Mariner
N 51° 29.032 W 000° 10.047
30U E 696666 N 5707440
Quick Description: This LCC blue plaque, to the Antarctic explorer Robert Scott, is attached to a house on the north east side of Oakley Street in London.
Location: London, United Kingdom
Date Posted: 10/22/2014 10:37:20 AM
Waymark Code: WMMPXW
Published By: Groundspeak Regular Member Hikenutty
Views: 0

Long Description:

The London County Council blue plaque tells us:

LCC

Robert
Falcon
Scott
Antarctic
Explorer
(1868 - 1912)
lived here

Wikipedia has an article about Scott that tells us:

Robert Falcon Scott, CVO (6 June 1868 – c. 29 March 1912) was a British Royal Navy officer and explorer who led two expeditions to the Antarctic regions: the Discovery Expedition, 1901–04, and the ill-fated Terra Nova Expedition, 1910–13. On the first expedition, he discovered the Polar Plateau, on which the South Pole is located. During the second venture, Scott led a party of five which reached the South Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that they had been preceded by Roald Amundsen's Norwegian expedition. On their return journey, Scott's party discovered plant fossils, proving Antarctica was once forested and joined to other continents. At a distance of 150 miles from their base camp and 11 miles from the next depot, Scott and his companions died from a combination of exhaustion, starvation and extreme cold.

Before his appointment to lead the Discovery Expedition, Scott had followed the conventional career of a naval officer in peacetime Victorian Britain. In 1899, he had a chance encounter with Sir Clements Markham, the president of the Royal Geographical Society, and learned for the first time of a planned Antarctic expedition. A few days later, on 11 June, Scott appeared at the Markham residence and volunteered to lead the expedition. Having taken this step, his name became inseparably associated with the Antarctic, the field of work to which he remained committed during the final twelve years of his life.

Following the news of his death, Scott became an iconic British hero, a status maintained without serious question for more than 50 years and reflected by the many permanent memorials erected across the nation. In the closing decades of the 20th century, the legend was reassessed as attention focused on the causes of the disaster that ended his and his comrades' lives. From a previously unassailable position, Scott became a figure of controversy, with questions raised about his competence and character. Commentators in the 21st century have on the whole regarded Scott more positively, emphasising his personal bravery and stoicism while acknowledging his errors and, more recently, errors by his team members, but ascribing his expedition's fate primarily to misfortune.

Type of Waymark: Point of Interest

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