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Glover Fulling Mill & King's Run - Haddon Heights, NJ
Posted by: Groundspeak Regular Member Math Teacher
N 39° 52.745 W 075° 04.354
18S E 493794 N 4414339
Quick Description: Recently, the Haddon Heights Historical Society has been marking their NRHP sites and other interesting sites with signage. This beautifully, newly installed interpretive educates visitors about this former Milling site and current RHP site.
Location: New Jersey, United States
Date Posted: 6/16/2012 8:19:33 PM
Waymark Code: WMEN2T
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member LowellHouseGuy
Views: 1

Long Description:

This excellent interpretive tells the tale of the former Glover Fulling Mill. Additionally, visitors can learn about 17th & 18th Century Transportation and Manufacturing in Haddon Heights. In the center of the marker is an old black and white photo of a mill structure, perhaps a residence.

I toured the ruins today and only learned about them because of the local historical society's historical marker (location of the coordinates) to direct visitors to the NRHP site. There is a trail that wraps around the stream and allows visitors to easily access the site. The park was developed in 1937 thanks to the Works Project Administration and the effort of the CCC boys. I saw some ruins but was unsure at what I was looking. At any rate. there is nothing restricted about this site.

It is recorded that the mill was destroyed by fire in 1822 and was rebuilt later in 1822. By 1830 there were 72 fulling mills in New Jersey but by 1850 the industrial revolution had begun and woolen mills had taken over the manufacture of cloth. After the Civil War the mill quietly passed out of production. The Glover Mill was torn down in 1917. A cannonball found embedded in the mill wall is located at the Haddon Heights Library. SOURCE

Parking is a cinch and there is plenty of it at N 39° 52.720 W 75° 04.428'W

The entire interpretive can be found HERE. The marker reads as follows:

The unusual topography in the McLaughlin-Norcross Dell area of the Camden County Park dates to the Colonial period. The steep slopes were related to King’s Run, a navigable waterway that provided the area’s first means of transportation in the 17th century when European settlement inWest Jersey began.

Until the 1920s, a stone mill stood on the opposite side of the stream behind the stage of the Dell. This mill housed machinery to clean cloth and make it thicker by controlled shrinking and beating, called fulling. When John Glover built his mill in 1773-76, he dammed King's Run and diverted water from just behind a dam through a channel called a headrace to run over the mill's waterwheel. The force of the flowing water as well as the weight of the water falling from above turned the wheel and its horizontal axle that moved wooden hammers to beat the cloth in a water-filled trough. After being fulled and dyed, the cloth was suspended in open fields for stretching, so that it would dry evenly and square. A tail race carried water away from the mill, depositing it back in King’sRun.

Betsy Ross was a customer of the Glover Mill and tradition says that the fabric for the American flag was processed here. The mill was destroyed by fire in 1822 and was rebuilt later that same year. However, by the second half of the 19th century, the industrial revolution had begun and steam-powered mills had taken over the manufacture of cloth. After the CivilWar the mill quietly passed out of production. The property was sold to the Borough of Haddon Heights in 1911 and although the mill was soon torn down, portions of the tail race, dam embankments, and the mill foundations survive. The current path of the stream reflects the old dam’s location.

You are also standing on the site of a Revolutionary War skirmish with British General Cornwallis after the Battle of Red Bank in 1777. A cannonball found embedded in the mill wall is now located at the Haddon Heights Library.

Sponsored by the Haddon Heights Historical Society
in Memory of Lynn Laitman

Marker Name: Glover Fulling Mill & King's Run; 17th & 18th Century Transportation and Manufacturing in Haddon Heights

Marker Type: Local? Unofficial

Marker text:
The unusual topography in the McLaughlin-Norcross Dell area of the Camden County Park dates to the Colonial period. The steep slopes were related to King’s Run, a navigable waterway that provided the area’s first means of transportation in the 17th century when European settlement inWest Jersey began. Until the 1920s, a stone mill stood on the opposite side of the stream behind the stage of the Dell. This mill housed machinery to clean cloth and make it thicker by controlled shrinking and beating, called fulling. When John Glover built his mill in 1773-76, he dammed King's Run and diverted water from just behind a dam through a channel called a headrace to run over the mill's waterwheel. The force of the flowing water as well as the weight of the water falling from above turned the wheel and its horizontal axle that moved wooden hammers to beat the cloth in a water-filled trough. After being fulled and dyed, the cloth was suspended in open fields for stretching, so that it would dry evenly and square. A tail race carried water away from the mill, depositing it back in King’sRun. Betsy Ross was a customer of the Glover Mill and tradition says that the fabric for the American flag was processed here. The mill was destroyed by fire in 1822 and was rebuilt later that same year. However, by the second half of the 19th century, the industrial revolution had begun and steam-powered mills had taken over the manufacture of cloth. After the CivilWar the mill quietly passed out of production. The property was sold to the Borough of Haddon Heights in 1911 and although the mill was soon torn down, portions of the tail race, dam embankments, and the mill foundations survive. The current path of the stream reflects the old dam’s location. You are also standing on the site of a Revolutionary War skirmish with British General Cornwallis after the Battle of Red Bank in 1777. A cannonball found embedded in the mill wall is now located at the Haddon Heights Library. Sponsored by the Haddon Heights Historical Society in Memory of Lynn Laitman


Dedication Date: 1/1/2012

City: Haddon Heights

County: Camden

Group responsible for placement: Haddon Heights Historical Society

Web Link: [Web Link]

Visit Instructions:
A photo of the 'Marker' or 'Plaque' is required to identify the location, plus a picture of the 'Historic Site', please ALSO provide a detailed description of your visit so we can form a 'mental image'
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