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St. Louis Holocaust Museum & Learning Center - St. Louis, Missouri
Posted by: Groundspeak Charter Member BruceS
N 38° 41.096 W 090° 24.445
15S E 725505 N 4285003
Quick Description: The Holocaust Museum & Learning Center is a very moving and well documented museum in suburban St. Louis.
Location: Missouri, United States
Date Posted: 8/26/2008 8:29:47 AM
Waymark Code: WM4HGC
Published By: Groundspeak Regular Member "Paws"itraction
Views: 90

Long Description:

"The St. Louis Holocaust Museum and Learning Center, one of only a few such facilities in the Midwest, preserves the story of the Holocaust and its impact on the lives of St. Louis Jews. It focuses on the Holocaust through the eyes of survivors-many of whom lived in the Lodz Ghetto of Poland and later came to St. Louis. The purpose of the center is not only to remember the Holocaust and examine its lessons but also to provide a learning center which teaches how to use the lessons of the Holocaust to fight against hate, intolerance and racism. The center also includes a curriculum resource library and oral history archives. The Museum, a department of the Jewish Federation of St. Louis, is located on the grounds of the Jewish Community Center.

SPECIAL NOTE ON AGE: Since some of the exhibits include graphic and disturbing photographs, it is suggested that school groups be in at least sixth grade if they plan to visit. Parents are advised that the museum is not recommended for young children.

HIGHLIGHTS:

  • The Museum's nine rooms focus on pre-Holocaust life, the Holocaust itself and the post-Holocaust period.
  • Cases of pre-World War II artifacts and photographs of folkloric and cultural interest detail Jewish life in Europe before the Holocaust.
  • A timeline highlights 1,000 years of Jewish history in Europe before World War II and a map shows world Jewish population centers in 1933. An audio presentation features St. Louisans speaking about their lives in Europe prior to World War II.
  • Exhibits, including photographs and artifacts of the period illustrate the rise of Nazism in Germany from 1933 to 1939. A timeline charts the progressive development of anti-Jewish legislation over a six-year period. Other displays focus on Nazi propaganda and racism, anti-Jewish legislation, the persecution of non-Jewish groups deemed "inferior," the difficulties of Jewish emigration, Kristallnacht and anti-Semitism in the U. S.
  • An exhibit on Jewish life in the ghettos of Europe after World War I contains rare film footage of ghetto life at the time.
  • Audio and visual presentations illustrate censorship, the burning of books, racism in Nazi schools and the 1933 fact-finding mission to Germany of Rabbi Ferdinand Isserman of St. Louis' Temple Israel.
  • The events of the years 1939-41 are depicted by photographs and artifacts on ghettos, slave labor camps, Jewish resistance and Nazi medical experiments. A three-dimensional floor model of the Lodz ghetto gives visitors a view of the daily lives of Polish Jews during that time period.
  • Holocaust survivors in audio presentations tell of their experiences in the Lodz ghetto and in slave labor camps.
  • Deportation, selection, death marches and the "Final Solution" are portrayed in the exhibit area documenting the years 1941-45. Holocaust survivors describe death marches in an audio presentation.
  • Another display area features artifacts and photographs on the rescue and protection of concentration camp survivors, the Nuremberg Trials, liberation and 1942 newspaper reports on the Holocaust as well as an audio presentation by survivors on the liberation.
  • The liberation of concentration camps at the end of World War II is also depicted.
  • On display are 140 pieces of memorabilia from local Holocaust survivors.
  • More than 250 photographs taken before and after the Holocaust are also displayed.
  • A final area documents life in the displaced persons camps, the birth of Israel and the emigration of Holocaust survivors to St. Louis.
  • An audio presentation by survivors and other eyewitnesses focuses on the displaced persons camps and the Nuremberg Trials.

" - Explore St. Louis website

Hours:
Monday - Thursday 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Friday 9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Saturday Closed
Sunday 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Physical Address:
12 Millstone Campus Drive
on the Jewish Community Center campus
St. Louis, Missouri United States
63146


Date Dedicated: 05/01/1995

Supporting Website: [Web Link]

Fee/Donation: Free

Memorial Type: Museum

Visit Instructions:
A picture of you is required at the site. A full description of your thoughts and experience on the site.
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